久9视频这里只有精品_自拍亚洲_俺去啦线视频在线观看

Pitt | Swanson Engineering

Since its founding in 1893 by two legends, George Westinghouse and Reginald Fessenden, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Pitt has excelled in education, research, and service.  Today, the department features innovative undergraduate and graduate programs and world-class research centers and labs, combining theory with practice at the nexus of computer and electrical engineering, for our students to learn, develop, and lead lives of impact.


Read our latest newsletter below




Mar
10
2020

Learn more about Pitt's planning and response to COVID-19

Bioengineering, Chemical & Petroleum, Civil & Environmental, Electrical & Computer, Industrial, MEMS, Diversity, Student Profiles, Office of Development & Alumni Affairs

Please visit and bookmark the University of Pittsburgh COVID-19 site for the most up-to-date information and a full list of resources. From the University Times: As the coronavirus COVID-19 continues to spread around the world, Pitt is remaining diligent with addressing related issues as the pop up. For an overall look at updates from Pitt, go to emergency.coralskeppelbaypreview.com. On Saturday, Provost Ann Cudd issued a statement about how to support faculty and staff who have committed to attending professional conferences this semester and choose not to attend due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The University will grant an exception for travel booked through May 31 and reimburse any out-of-pocket expenses incurred by those who decide to cancel travel. The administration will reassess this deadline date as COVID-19 evolves and may extend the deadline as conditions evolve. For more updates from the provost, go to provost.coralskeppelbaypreview.com. The provost and the University Center for Teaching and Learning is encouraging faculty to be prepared if remote learning situations become required. The center has set up a page detailing the basics of providing instructional continuity. The page will be updated regularly. Find information about remote learning and more at teaching.coralskeppelbaypreview.com/instructional-continuity. All business units and responsibilities centers also are being asked to work on how to handle mass absenteeism and/or the need for as many people as possible to work at home.

Mar
4
2020

ECE Alumnus and Fulbright Scholar Pursues MS in Electrical Engineering in Germany

Electrical & Computer

PITTSBURGH (March 4, 2020) — David Skrovanek (ECE’19), a University of Pittsburgh alumnus, electrical engineer, accomplished musician, and polyglot, is adding Fulbright Scholar to his list of accomplishments. One of the 14 Pitt students and alumni to receive a Fulbright in 2019, Skrovanek is currently earning his master’s in electrical engineering with a concentration in optical and radio telecommunications at the Hochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft, in Dresden, Germany. “When I started college, if you'd asked me if I’d end up in Germany as a Fulbright Scholar, I'd say, “No way!” says Skrovanek. “But sticking to my true self and what interests me and pursuing things I’m passionate about has worked out for me.” A double major in electrical engineering and German while at Pitt, Skrovanek participated in a Maymester study abroad program in Munich. Upon returning, Lesha Greene, scholar mentor in the Pitt Honors College, encouraged him to pursue a Fulbright to study in Germany after graduation. Though it wasn’t necessarily an easy transition at first, Skrovanek is proud of his progress so far. “In the first week of classes, I found out I was the only non-German student in the class. I was confident in my German-speaking abilities, but lectures were challenging to follow, and with dialects and technical vocabulary, I was lucky if I understood half of what they were saying,” he recalls. “But comparing that with the last week of classes, now I can understand all of it and feel comfortable talking about electrical engineering in German. I’ve definitely come a long way, and I’m proud of that.” Among those encouraging him to pursue a degree abroad was William Stanchina, professor of electrical and computer engineering who retired from the Swanson School last year. “I worked with Dr. Stanchina during my junior year, and even though I ended up going into a different area of electrical engineering, he remained kind of a mentor for me and encouraged me to get outside of my comfort zone,” says Skrovanek. “He told me that there is a lot of top-notch research being conducted in other parts of the world, and how important it was to recognize that.” In addition to his coursework, Skrovanek is engaging in research that will help electrical grid operators more efficiently distribute electricity and plan networks more effectively. The research uses fiber optic sensors to measure air temperature, wind speed, and transmission lines’ real-time thermal expansion. He will use that information along with the grid operator’s distribution data to mathematically predict the lines’ expected thermal expansion as it relates to current weather conditions, which will help avoid the dangerous sagging power lines that result from overheating. After graduation, Skrovanek plans to return to the U.S. and pursue a doctorate in electrical engineering. For now, he’s enjoying his studies and learning from his new friends. “I always enjoyed studying a foreign language and a foreign culture. I find I learn more about myself as well as my own culture through that,” he says. “I always had that interest, and I stuck with it. It’s interesting to see the twists and turns that has led to in my professional life.”
Maggie Pavlick
Feb
27
2020

Michael Sullivan Selected for 2020 Siemens Peter Hammond Scholarship

Electrical & Computer

PITTSBURGH (Feb. 27, 2020) — Michael Sullivan, a master’s student in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering, has been selected to receive this year’s Siemens Peter Hammond Scholarship for $10,000. The scholarship is named for Peter Hammond, inventor of the Perfect Harmony drive and long-time engineer at Siemens who is now retired. Hammond’s Perfect Harmony drive is a high-power machine that controls the speed of large motors; today, it is a key part of Siemens’ medium voltage variable frequency drive portfolio. The resulting energy savings on large pumps, fans, compressors, and other industrial equipment have had an enormous environmental impact, the carbon footprint equivalent of removing millions of cars from the road. The annual scholarship, which is in its fourth year, was open to any student in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Swanson School. Students must complete an application, supplementing it with an essay, letters of recommendation, a resume and their transcript. “Not only is Michael’s academic work remarkable, but he embodies the humility and good nature that Peter Hammond embodied throughout his career,” says Brandon Grainger, PhD, associate director of the Energy GRID Institute, Eaton Faculty Fellow and assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the Swanson School. “This scholarship invests in the students who will someday be the engineers pursuing bold ideas like the Perfect Harmony drive.” Before attending Swanson School, Sullivan worked for a decade as an electrician, where he was first introduced to the field of electrical engineering. Excited to learn of a career path so well suited to his curiosity about how things work, he pursued a bachelor’s degree at Pitt. Once he finishes earning his master’s degree in 2021, he plans to become a research engineer and work part-time toward a PhD. Previous recipients include Jacob Friedrich, MSEE; Thomas Cook, MSEE; and Ryan Brody, MSEE. The scholarship was presented Feb. 21, 2020, and included a presentation by Jason Hoover, director of business development at Siemens Industry. “The pool of applicants for this year’s scholarship was diverse and impressive, and we’re proud to have Michael Sullivan as the recipient of the 2020 Siemens Peter Hammond Scholarship,” says Hoover. “Michael’s innovative spirit, humility, and passion for engineering are all virtues that reflect Pete Hammond and make Michael a very worthy recipient of this award.”
Maggie Pavlick
Feb
12
2020

Researchers Celebrate Pioneer’s Work on World Radio Day

Electrical & Computer

Originally published in Pittwire. Reposted with permission. Every day, people use wireless technologies that may be taken for granted, like music streaming, FaceTime and podcasts listened to on smartphones. All of this and more can be traced back to the work of Reginald Fessenden, described by the United States National Park Service as the “Father of Voice Radio.” Fessenden served as chairman of the electrical engineering department at Pitt when it was called the Western University of Pennsylvania. The department has since evolved into today’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. “Fessenden was one of the greatest engineers and inventors in history, truly a genius,” said Alan George, the department’s current chair. “Much of the research and education in my field, electrical and computer engineering, including my research on space systems, sensors and missions, wouldn’t exist without his pioneering work in radio communications. Our department is most proud to have been founded by the father of radio.” Fessenden was recruited to Pitt in 1893 by George Westinghouse, who developed the alternating current electrical system and the Westinghouse light bulb among other innovations. Fessenden previously helped Westinghouse with electrical infrastructure and lighting for the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago and, prior to that, worked with another inventor he admired, Thomas Edison. It was at Pitt where Fessenden began experimenting with the foundations of what would become radio technology, at a time when wireless communication was very limited and people could only send messages via Morse code’s dashes and dots. By 1899, he was able to send wireless telegraphs between Pittsburgh and the former Allegheny City, now Pittsburgh’s North Side. He would leave Pitt in 1900 to dedicate his time to inventing, eventually being employed by the National Electric Signaling Company. His next achievements included the first wireless transmission of speech by radio in 1900, and the first two-way transcontinental radiotelegraphic transmission in 1906. Fessenden developed concepts and technologies for transmission and reception of continuous-wave signals, in the form of amplitude-modulated (AM) radio signals carrying audio information such as speech and music, which was a leap beyond the spark-gap transmitters of the day used for Morse code. AM signaling would later lead to frequency-modulated (FM) signaling, the two keystones of radio technology, and many more radio-frequency technologies that followed. “Fessenden laid the foundation for all modern communications,” George said. “Throughout our modern society, from TV to cell phones to GPS satellites, you can trace back to the work of Fessenden on radio technology. He deserves far more credit than he ever received.” Fessenden’s legacy at Pitt has been carried through the decades, with the late Marlin Mickle advancing research in the application of radio frequency energy. Mickle was the Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor in the Swanson School of Engineering, holding a primary appointment as professor of electrical and computer engineering and secondary appointments in computer engineering, biomedical engineering, industrial engineering and telecommunications. He worked as a Pitt faculty member from 1962 until his retirement in 2013. Mickle had over 40 patents licensed, including a method to passively power image capturing and a method to control radio frequency transmissions to mitigate interference with critical care equipment. Pitt’s licensing of his patents led to seven spinoff companies forming. Mickle also directed Pitt’s Radio Frequency Identification Center of Excellence, which focused on research pertaining to advancements in wireless medical and engineering technologies. “He (Mickle) would make sure to dedicate part of his time to telling students in his networking classes about Fessenden and his work so they knew the connection between Fessenden and the department,” said Sam Dickerson, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering. “He would tell students ‘Nothing is new,’ and that all technology we have is simply repackaged ideas implemented with better devices.” In medicine, communication is important for faster accurate diagnoses and treatments. "A lot of work in my field wouldn’t be possible without Fessenden’s work,” said Christopher Brown, an associate professor in Pitt’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. “Wireless communication has solved many problems in medicine. You can try using wires to transmit information from an external device to an implant in a patient’s body, but then you have the problems of infection, device failures and inconvenience.” Brown studies psychoacoustics, speech understanding in the presence of background noise, hearing impairment and cochlear implant processing. “Hearing devices have a direct link to Fessenden’s work,” he said. “For example, when someone has hearing aids in both ears, the aids will ‘communicate’ with each other to adjust volume levels so the listener is more comfortable. A cochlear implant is another surgically implanted device that takes radio information from external components through the skin into audio.” Pitt’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering reflects every year on the importance of Fessenden’s work at its graduation ceremony. “It’s important for every engineer to understand history in their field, because we can foresee much about the future by understanding the past,” George said. “The inventors of that era were amazing, and much of their new science was based upon faith in their ideas and that they can be successful, even when others didn’t believe in them.”
Author: Amerigo Allegretto, University Communications
Feb
12
2020

Dr. Steven Jacobs on the History of Radio

Electrical & Computer

As part of World Radio Day and the Centennial of KDKA-AM in Pittsburgh, Dr. Steven Jacobs spoke with Robert Mangino about the legacy of Reginald Fessenden, the "Father of Radio" and first Department Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Pitt.

Upcoming Events


back
view more